3 Ways To Help Jobs Find You

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It’s easy to find a plethora of job openings posted online to submit applications for. What’s challenging is getting certain of those job opportunities to find you amongst a very competitive global pool of candidates. To resolve at least some of the challenges, here are 3 ways to help jobs and the recruiters posting them to find you:

  1. Enable LinkedIn to share with recruiters that you’re open to new opportunities. If you’re currently employed and don’t want to tip off your boss or colleagues that you’re seeking something new, LinkedIn has you covered by taking great measures to NOT show your current company that you’re open.
  2. Share your full profile with the job poster on LinkedIn when you’re taken off of LinkedIn to submit an application. This greatly increases your chance to be viewed by whoever posted the job opportunity. While you’re at it, you might as well send a brief InMail to the job poster and get their attention more expediently. Your message should basically read as a one-paragraph cover letter (don’t forget to attach a copy of your resume).
  3. Get and stay active in your local community. You never know who may be available to share pertinent information or even to hire you directly as a result of your contributions and hard work in a shared cause. Keep a few copies of your resume handy, and always behave professionally since you don’t know who’s who among the crowd initially. Get involved with something you genuinely care about, or else you’ll come off as just an opportunist.

5 Ways To Neutralize Micromanagers

One of the biggest demotivators any professional can experience in their career is a micromanaging boss. They’re highly stressful individuals who misrepresent their stress and anxiety as intensity and passion. They confuse distrust and insecurity with perfectionism and obsession with details. And more often than not they are very inexperienced and fearful of failure. Defying them can be detrimental to your own success, no matter how annoying and frustrating they are. Therefore it’s best to strategically outmaneuver them. Here are 5 ways to neutralize micromanagers:

  1. Establish Constant Communication. Micromanagers are often consumed with anxiety about what’s happening or what’s not happening. It’s best to keep them well informed so that their level of anxiety is kept to a minimum. Provide updates to them frequently and ask them loads of clarifying questions when they make requests or inquiries.
  2. Become a Master of Anticipation. It’s much better to anticipate requests than to be caught off-guard. Micromanagers tend to frequently change their minds about what they’re asking you for, repeatedly changing details of the requests as you progress through them. Do them and yourself a favor and anticipate any potential issues or change requests on the first ask. That way you can establish alternative deliverables ahead of time. Mastering anticipation may also earn you more of the micromanagers trust, which should result in them falling back a bit and allowing you some space to operate.
  3. Collect Evidence of Your Productivity. Using apps such as TOGGL you can track how you spend your time, broken down by project, task, and subtask. This can serve as proof that you’re highly productive without the constant peering over the shoulder. You could also volunteer to share your productivity reports weekly or even daily with your micromanaging spaz of a boss. This should help put them somewhat at ease and allow you a bit more breathing room for creativity and general independent thought.
  4. Be Direct and Confront the Issue Tactfully. When making a few compromises isn’t effective enough to neutralize the situation, then it’s time to take the direct approach of confronting the issue, tactfully of course. Let your boss know that you feel stifled and untrusted. Share with them again your work history and impact, dispelling the need for micromanaging you as a professional. If they’re not understanding of your position, and decide that it’s their way or the highway, then move on to number five below.
  5. Fire Them. That’s right, fire your micromanaging boss by resigning and moving on into a more suitable company culture. No experienced professional wants to be badgered or berated all day, especially for miscellaneous things. If you’ve proven your ability to be productive and successful, then you’ve earned some level of trust and independence. Don’t let your ingenuity and creativity be limited by the likes of micromanagers – just keep it moving in a positive way. Onward and upward.

3 Great Lessons From The Worst Job I’ve Ever Had

The worst job I’ve ever had actually turned out to be great because it taught me some valuable lessons. I love to learn, although I prefer it not be the hard way. One of my missions in life is to empower career changers and military veterans with useful knowledge and information about careering. You don’t have to learn the hard way (if you haven’t already). Here are 3 great lessons from the worst job I’ve ever had:

  1. A Higher Salary does not mean an employer grants you greater responsibility or more trust. Instead, it can mean that an employer will demand more of your time and energy, outside of the norm, because they feel entitled. I learned this lesson especially during my Paternity Leave when my wife was about to deliver our second child. My work phone was called literally every day for non-emergencies, and I was penalized for not answering every beckoning call. Also, I went from being the senior site leader at my previous job with my own office and with great trust and respect from my higher ups to being a regional leader in title only, since I then became relegated to working at a desk in an open floor layout where I was micromanaged and treated more like an hourly administrative assistant. I’ll stop there with my venting, and get to the point: consider every aspect of compensation before accepting a job offer (i.e. workspace, paid time off, education benefits, freebies and discounts, etc.).
  2. If you’re promised things during the interview process, such as being able to work from home whenever it’s not essential to be at the corporate office, then be sure to GET IT IN WRITING before you sign and accept the job offer. Sometimes, very rarely, employers will use a “bait and switch” approach to getting you onboard. Whether intentional or not, this scenario points to a serious lack of integrity. When you’re hired, you’re expected to do exactly what you said you could do during the interviews. Empower yourself by expecting an employer to do exactly as they said also, and hold them accountable because you will surely be held accountable if you don’t deliver.
  3. Read company reviews online from legit sources like Glassdoor. If most of the reviews are negative, especially pertaining to overall company culture, and definitely when the negative reviews spring from multiple locations across the country, then you may want to just decline the offer and move on to something different. Working in a toxic company culture for an obviously negative organization is not worth the stress and headaches, regardless of the amount of money.

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GRIT.GRIND.GROW! Podcast Episode-001: Conquering Career Transition Through Technology

Click-Here-To-Listen-To-The-Show

Special Guest: Jerome Hardaway, Founder & Executive Director at Vets Who Code
Email: hello@vetswhocode.io
Twitter: @JeromeHardaway and @VetsWhoCode
 
Recommended Books:
1. Rework by Jason Fried & David Heinemeier Hansson
2. Remote: Office Not Required by Jason Fried & David Heinemeier Hansson
3. Dataclysm: Love, Sex, Race, and Identity–What Our Online Lives Tell Us About Our Offline Selves by Christian Rudder
4. How to Build a Billion Dollar App by George Berkowski
 
Business Promo:
GUILT-FREE PASTRIES – http://www.GuiltFreePastries.com
 
Article Shared:
“The No. 1 Reason Companies Can’t Get Good People To WOrk For Them” by J.T. O’Donnell – http://www.inc.com/jt-odonnell/the-no-1-unfortunate-reason-companies-cant-get-good-people-to-work-for-them.html

THE DR. DIONNE SHOW: Hiring Veterans & Athletes

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(Lex Brown, Dr. Dionne Poulton, Sean Rainey & Sam Douglas)

http://gwinnettbusinessradio.businessradiox.com/2016/10/16/poulton-consulting-2/

This episode of “The Dr. Dionne Show” features a vibrant discussion about the unique skills and values that veterans and athletes have in common that make them “low risk hires” and invaluable workplace pillars. You will hear the impressive personal stories of Lex R. Brown II, a former athlete and veteran of the U.S. Air Force and Operation Iraqi Freedom, turned entrepreneur; Sam Douglas, former standout basketball player turned corporate executive and basketball coach; and Sean Rainey, who is a boys basketball coach, former athlete and a retired police detective with the New York City Police Department. Listeners, especially hiring managers and HR representatives will learn why “bias” is not necessarily a bad thing when making the decision to hire a veteran or athlete, especially when filling a leadership position.

5 Great Benefits of Hiring Veterans

Job-seeking military veterans are ultra-competitive candidates. They have proven track records and in-demand skill sets. Sometimes their value gets lost in translation, but here you’ll find some of the crystal clear benefits for recruiting and hiring them.

Currently, there are many commendable initiatives advocating for the hiring of military veterans. I greatly appreciate every organization and individual concerned with the interests of our country’s transitioning service members. However, as a military veteran myself, I’d like to turn the tables and focus on how hiring military veterans is a lucrative move for companies across every industry. Here are just five of the many amazing benefits of hiring veterans:

1. CAPABLE CHANGE AGENTS

Change can be challenging and is often met with resistance But there are people out there who know how to both embrace and implement change. Those people are often veterans. They are going to ask the tough questions, intent on truly understanding the coming changes so that they can be an active and impactful contributor to the overall transformation. They will also support the change leader(s)’s vision and they will help to communicate it to other team members. They will act with patience, as they have been through many changes throughout their time spent in a military uniform.

2. PEER-TO-PEER ACCOUNTABILITY

Military veterans are excellent at keeping themselves and those around them on track. Integrity, order, and discipline all play a factor here, which are some of the greatest attributes of veterans. As a current Operations Manager with over 50 employees I am responsible for, I find that high levels of peer-to-peer accountability coincide with high levels of morale. Not only will veterans be very vocal in identifying non-compliance, they will also offer support in correcting any issues…

(Continue Reading at Udacity for Business Blog…)

6 Great Blogs To Subscribe To For Career Transition Guidance

Career change is almost never easy, but it can be simplified in some instances. From mid 2012 to nearly the end of 2014, I was on an unrelenting career transition journey, as I transformed from active duty military service member to where I am today. Throughout that time I needed guidance, sound advice, inspiration, and some times just a good story to read. The six blogs listed below gave me all of that and more. I’m hoping they can do the same for you.

1-CAREEREALISM:

The belief at CAREEREALISM is that every job is temporary. That’s why it’s so important to stay informed and to keep learning, growing, acquiring new skills, and relationship building. CAREEREALISM produces an exclusive Recruiter Directory, publishes a daily career insights newsletter, and presents “sneak peeks” articles with the inside scoop about employers to help you find a workplace that fits you best.

2-UDACITY:

Want to learn how to be considered “in demand” as a job seeker? Are you pondering an effective entry into the world of technology professionals? Well then this is the blog for you. Better yet, one of UDACITY’s Nanodegree programs may just be the solution you need to fix your income stream. Gain highly desired credentials that are built and recognized by industry leaders such as Google and General Electric. Check out UDACITY’s blog for further details.

3-TASK & PURPOSE:

This is a great news and culture site, primarily focused on providing a platform to amplify the voices of millennial American veterans. If you’re seeking amazing stories to motivate you, challenge your perceptions, intrigue healthy debate, or simply to lighten your mood, then Task & Purpose should become a go-to source for you.

4-MELISSAWASHINGTON.COM:

As a fellow military veteran, Melissa Washington is an outstanding advocate for women and veterans in the labor market. In fact, she is the Founder and Director at Women Veterans Alliance. She is also the author of “Get Back to Work”, a book on real-world strategic career moves to put you ahead of your competitors.

5-AMERICANDREAMU.ORG:

As put simply on its website, American Dream U is committed to empowering those that serve. The site provides a ton of free resources, mentor networks, and a calendar of its signature events like VETRACON. Founder Phil Randazzo, a serial entrepreneur and investor, is a genuine proponent of active duty military members, veterans, and spouses finding their dream job and/or entrepreneur resources.

6-G.I. JOBS:

Coming out of active duty Air Force in 2012, G.I. Jobs is what I primarily consumed for inspiration and information. The stories are highly motivational, the employer profiles are deeply insightful, and the extra tools provided were critical to my eventual career change successes (i.e. the pay calculator, the interview survival kit, and the transition readiness quiz).

I look at career transition as a never-ending journey. In that mindset, I also pursue perpetual development as a professional. That’s why I’m subscribed to all six of the above mentioned blogs, and why I’m also a contributing writer to several of them. They each provide value in exchange for your time and attention.